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Plenary Program

Monday, September 7, 2009 – Palais de Beaulieu, confirmed speakers

hierlemann
Prof. Andreas Hierlemann, ETHZ, Switzerland

CMOS-Based Bio/Chemosensors and Bioelectronic Microsystems


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Abstract:

Microfabrication techniques and, in particular, CMOS technology have been used to devise chemo/biosensors as well as bioelectronic microsystems. Examples of microstructured bio/chemosensors, integrated with analog and digital circuitry components on the same CMOS microsystem chip will be shown. Moreover, CMOS-based, fully integrated microelectrode arrays for bidirectional communication (stimulation and recording) with electrogenic cells at subcellular resolution will be presented. These devices are capable of monitoring relevant electrophysiological responses of cells to electrical stimuli or to pharmacological agents with prospective applications in the field of bio-inspired information processing or pharmascreening.

Bio:

Born in Ochsenhausen, Germany, in 1964, Andreas Hierlemann completed his college education in chemistry at the University of Tübingen (Diploma 1992) and was awarded a PhD degree in Physical Chemistry in 1996 by the Eberhard-Karls University in Tübingen, Germany. After that, he held two postdoc positions at the Texas A & M University, 1997, in College Station, Texas, USA, and at the Sandia National Laboratories, 1997-1998, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. In 1999 he joined the Department of Physics of ETH Zurich, where he was appointed associate professor of "Microsensorics" in June 2004. In April 2008 he became full professor of "Biosystems Engineering" at the Department of Biosystems, Science and Engineering (BSSE) of ETH Zurich in Basel.

His research interests include the development of integrated chemical and biomicrosensor systems, the development of microfluidic techniques for cell handling and cell characterization, and the direct coupling of biological entities, such as neurons or heart cells, to microelectronic chips.

hierlemann
Prof. Karl Boehringer, University of Washington, USA

Controlled liquid-solid interactions at the micron-scale: towards self-assembling MEMS

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Abstract:

Self-assembly is the spontaneous and reversible organization of components into ordered structures, representing an alternative to the conventional manufacture of systems made of components from milli to nano scales. First commercial applications of self-assembly have appeared in recent years, for example in the fabrication of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. However, the full impact of this new approach towards hetero system integration will only be realized once self-assembly can be programmed on demand. This presentation gives an overview of several projects that aim at programmable self-assembly. A key concept is the “programmable surface” – an interface whose properties can be controlled with high spatial and temporal resolution. Several crucial topics are discussed: real time control of interfacial properties; optimization of binding site designs; and algorithms for the modeling and control of self-assembly. Promising novel manufacturing methods are emerging that combine the precision and reproducibility of semiconductor fabrication with the scalability and parallelism of stochastic self-assembly and with the specificity and programmability of biochemical processes.

Bio:

Karl Böhringer is Professor of Electrical Engineering with adjunct appointments in Computer Science & Engineering and in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Washington, Seattle. He received both his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from Cornell University and his Diplom-Informatiker degree from the University of Karlsruhe, Germany. He was a visiting scholar at the Stanford Robotics Lab and Transducer Lab and a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, before joining the faculty at the University of Washington.

His current interests include micromanipulation and microassembly, as well as biomedical implants and bioMEMS for single-cell genomics and proteomics. He received an NSF postdoctoral associateship in 1997, an NSF CAREER award in 1999, and was an NSF New Century Scholar in 2000. His work was featured among the Top 100 Science Stories in Discover Magazine's 2002 "Year in Science". In 2004, he received the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society Academic Early Career Award and a sabbatical fellowship from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS).

someya
Prof. Takao Someya, University of Tokyo, Japan

Printed skin-like large-area flexible sensors and actuators


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Abstract:

In the forthcoming ambient electronics era, multiple electronic objects are scattered on walls, ceilings or in imaginative locations and interact each other to enhance safety, security and convenience. For implementation of many electronic objects in our daily life, large-area sheet-type devices are expected to play an important role. In this talk, I will describe recent progress and future prospects of printed skin-like large-area flexible sensors and actuators. Moreover, the issues and the future prospect of flexible devices such as printed plastic MEMS devices and organic transistors will be addressed from the view point of ambient electronics.

Bio:

Takao Someya received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from University of Tokyo, Japan, in 1997. From 2001 to 2003, he worked on organic electronics in the Nanocenter (NSEC) of Columbia University and Bell Labs as a Visiting Scholar. Since 2003, he has been an Associate Professor of the Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo. His current research focus is organic transistors, flexible electronics, plastic circuits, and molecular scale electronics. He is an IEEE/EDS Distinguished Lecturer since 2004 and a recipient of 2004 IEEE/ISSCC Takuo Sugano Award. His “ large-area sensor array” electronic thin film was featured in Time Magazine as one of its “Best Inventions of 2005” in its November 21st issue.